ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

 

EN 301 English Writing (2)

A course devoted to helping students produce, revise and edit effective prose. Students learn to separate the creating from the criticizing process through a number of activities, including daily journal writing, in-class free-writing, group work for feedback on writing drafts and discussion of writing samples.

 

EN 302  Expository Writing (2)

An advanced workshop-styled course in rhetoric and essay writing. Specific attention will be paid to the relationships between audience, purpose, voice and style of mature scholarly and popular discourse.

 

EN 303  Writing Theory (2)

An examination of contemporary theories of the writing process, with special emphasis on the writing-reading connection. Attention will be given classroom application of the theories discussed.

 

EN 304 Christian Literature (2)

An overview of the masterworks of eastern and western Christian cultures from the rise of ancient civilizations to the modern age.

 

EN 305 Christian Drama (2)

A study of selected christian drama from ancient to present.

 

EN 306 Short Story (2)

Concentrations in short fiction of various cultural traditions, periods, themes, or individuals.

 

EN 307 Mythology (2)

A study of the major mythological traditions, especially in relation to their influence on literature.

                                                                          

EN 308 Oxford Christian Writers (2)

 Selected works of George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, Charles Williams, Dorothy Sayers, C.S.Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien, with a dual emphasis on literary craftsmanship and theological insight in each.

 

EN 401 Literary Criticism (2)

A comprehensive survey of theory and methodology in literary criticism with particular emphasis on major critics such as Plato, Aristotle, Sidney, Johnson, Arnold, Freud, Woolf, and Derrida.

 

EN 402 Renaissance Literature (2)

A study of the English Renaissance writers(1500-1660_ with special attention to Elizabethan drama, sonnet tradition, lyric verse and religious poetry of the Metaphysics.

 

EN 403 American Romanticism (2)

A study of the development of the Romantic mind and imagination in America. Selected works of Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Douglass, and Dickinson.

 

EN 404 American Realism (2)

The reaction to sentimental Romanticism in fiction, Prose, and poetry, and the rise of literary realism and naturalism. Selected works of William Dean Howells, Bret Harte, Samuel Clemens, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, Henry James, Edith Wharton, Henry Adams, and Edwin Arlington Robinson.

 

EN 405 Modern Poetry (2)

Close reading of selected twentieth century British and American poets.

 

EN 405 Modern Novels (2)

Selected novels from British and American traditions of the twentieth century. Included are the works of authors such as Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Dreiser, Faulkner, Woolf and Hemingway.

 

EN 406 History of English Language (2)

A study of the development of English grammar, syntax, and morphology from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present, with emphasis on reading Old and Middle English texts.

 

EN 407  English Grammar and Phonology (2)

A study of the basic components of linguistics and their application. Phonological and morphological analysis of contemporary American speech. Attention is given to the morphological and syntactic structure of standard English.

 

EN 408 Language Acquisition (2)

A study of current theory and research in second language acquisition with particular reference to the acquisition of English. Psycholinguistics of language learning is the study of the basic principles of language learning theories as advanced by the proponents of the behavioral and cognitive models.

                                                                          

EN 409 Shakespeare and Milton (2)

Intensive analysis of selected dramatic canon of William Shakespeare and Concentration on the major poetry and prose of John Milton.

 

EN 410 Topics in Literature (2)

Senior majors workshop in literary bibliography and research. Past topics have included Freud and literature, T.S. Eliot and “the great tradition,” and Hamlet and the history of criticism.